Posts Tagged ‘Fame’

Black Men Don’t Matter on Decades Channel

February 17, 2017

I’m white, but I am concerned that the  February schedule for the “Decades” television channel  could indicate the staff is racist.   February is supposed to be Black History month, but you can barely tell it from the Decades program schedule.   The emphasis is on publicizing the lives of those they call remarkable women even though women have the month of March as their month.

Decades normally has a schedule that combines history documentaries and entertainment programs. Each weekday has a program that summarizes major events that occurred on that day which may include events such as a birth or career milestone in a celebrity’s life.  Weekends have marathons called “binges” of a single series.  Lately they have been running mini-binges with two 3-hour periods devoted to a single series possibly featuring a celebrity being emphasized that day.   This month they are running series featuring predominately white women.  They are running a week of shows featuring black women, but except for “Touched by an Angel”  the shows have a white male as the principle character.

There aren’t very many female entertainers who are more remarkable than Debbie Allen who played  a dancing teacher on “Fame” while being the show’s choreographer.  She later became a successful director.   Diahann Carroll as “Julia” was one of the first black women to play the central character in a sitcom.    “Barefoot in the Park”, a series about a young black couple,  was the first show since “Amos and Andy” to feature a predominately black cast.  Teresa Graves starred in “Get Christie Love” the first series about  a police woman since the fifties’ series “Police Decoy”,

I had expected they would emphasize programs featuring black performers to observe Black History Month possibly including episodes of Nat King Cole’s program.   There’s no good reason to run women’s programs instead of black programs this month. One thing that would have been great would have been to run different series showing how the roles available to blacks changed since the fifties.   If they wanted to devote two months to women’s programs instead of one month they could have used April instead of February.   The devotion of a week to black women indicates they believe  black women matter.  The lack of a similar  week for lack men implies they don’t believe black  men matter.

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